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Tan Paper and Copper Silk Love Wall Scroll
Red Paper and Ivory Silk Love Wall Scroll
Orange Paper Love Scroll
Crazy Blue and Gold Silk Love Scroll


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Love Vertical Portrait
Love Horizontal Wall Scroll
Love Vertical Portrait

The name God Strength in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a God Strength calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “God Strength” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “God Strength” title below...


  1. Body and Earth in Unity

  2. Cooperation

  3. Courage and Strength

  4. Creativity

  5. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33

  6. Fortitude / Strength of Character

  7. Perseverance / Fortitude

  8. Girl Power / Woman Power

  9. God Give Me Strength

10. Gutsy / Daring / Bold

11. Hapkido

12. Healthy Living

13. Imagination

14. Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude

15. Indomitable / Unyielding

16. Inner Strength / Inner Well-Being and Health

17. Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance

18. Inner Strength

19. Inner Strength / Self-Improvement

20. Intensity

21. Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself

22. Lee

23. Love Faith Strength

24. Mighty / Powerful / Strong

25. Mind Over Matter

26. No Pain No Gain

27. Perseverance

28. Perseverance / Will-Power

29. Perseverance / Indomitable / Invincible Fortitude

30. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

31. Potential / Momentum

32. Resilience / Restoration / Recovery

33. Strength and Love in Unity

34. Sincere / True Sincerity

35. Flexibility Overcomes Strength

36. Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit

37. Strength / Ability

38. Strength and Honor

39. Strength and Love

40. Strength and Courage

41. Herculean Strength

42. Strength / Vigor / Energy

43. Physical Strength

44. Power / Strength

45. Strength: Strong and Solid

46. Always Striving for Inner Strength

47. Strong / Powerful

48. Strong / Powerful / Force

49. Strong / Robust

50. Strong / Healthy

51. Strong and Beautiful

52. Strong / Healthy

53. Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

54. With all the strength of your heart

55. Strong Woman

56. Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan

57. Tempering Makes Strong Steel

58. Tenacious / Tenacity

59. Carry On, Undaunted

60. Vitality

61. Stay Strong / Iron Will

62. Determination to Achieve / Will-Power

63. Will-Power / Self-Control

64. Dragon

65. Shitsujitsu Goken

66. Great Power

67. Conquering Yourself is a Sign of Strength

68. Strength Love Honor


Body and Earth in Unity

 shindofuni / shindofuji
Body and Earth in Unity Scroll

身土不二 (Shindofuni) is originally a Buddhist concept or proverb referring to the inseparability of body-mind and geographical circumstances.

This reads, “Body [and] earth [are] not two.”

Other translations or matching ideas include:
Body and land are one.
Body and earth can not be separated.
Body earth sensory curation.
You are what you eat.
Indivisibility of the body and the land (because the body is made from food and food is made from the land).

Going further, this speaks of our human bodies and the land from which we get our food being closely connected. This phrase is often used when talking about natural and organic vegetables coming directly from the farm to provide the healthiest foods in Japan.

Character notes: 身(shin) in this context does not just mean your physical body but a concept including both body and mind.
土 (do) refers to the soil, earth, clay, land, or in some cases, locality. It's not the proper name of Earth, the planet. However, it can refer to the land or realm we live in.

Japanese note: This has been used in Japan, on and off, since 1907 as a slogan for a governmental healthy eating campaign (usually pronounced as shindofuji instead of the original shindofuni in this context). It may have been hijacked from Buddhism for this propaganda purpose, but at least this is “healthy propaganda.”

Korean note: The phrase 身土不二 was in use by 1610 A.D. in Korea, where it can be found in an early medical journal.
In modern South Korea, it's written in Hangul as 신토불이. Korea used Chinese characters (same source as Japanese Kanji) as their only written standard form of the language until about a hundred years ago. Therefore, many Koreans will recognize this as a native phrase and concept.


See Also:  Strength and Love in Unity

 xié lì
 kyouryoku
Cooperation Scroll

協力 is a Japanese word that means cooperation.

If you look at the second character, which means “strength” or “power,” and then you look at the first character, you will see that the first character seems to represent multiple “strengths” together. Thus, you can visually see the meaning of this word as “stronger when working together.” The combination of characters that form this word is commonly seen in Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja but not used in China (however, a Chinese person could probably guess the meaning, and it can be pronounced in Chinese).

It is implied that you are cooperating to create some project or product.

This can also be translated as “joint effort.”


See Also:  Partnership

Courage and Strength

 yǒng lì
 yuu ri
Courage and Strength Scroll

勇力 is a very short way to say “courage and strength” in Chinese and Japanese.

In Japanese, it's read more like “strong courage” or “powerful courage.” This can also be the personal name Yuri or Yuuri in Japanese.

 chuàng zào lì
 souzouryoku
Creativity Scroll

創造力 is a word that means “strength of creativity” or sort of “creativity (is your) strength.”

This can also be translated as “ingenuity.”

Creativity is the power of imagination. It is discovering your own special talents. Daring to see things in new ways and find different ways to solve problems. With your creativity, you can bring something new into the world.

The first character means “to create,” and the second means “to make or build.” Together they mean “creative.” The third character means “strength.”

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33

 zhī rén zhě zhī yě zì zhī zhě míng yě shèng rén zhě yǒu lì yě zì shèng zhě qiáng yě zhī zú zhě fù yě qiáng xíng zhě yǒu zhì yě bù zhī qí suǒ zhě jiǔ yě sǐ ér bù wáng zhě shòu yě
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33 Scroll

This is referred to as passage or chapter 33 of the Dao De Jing (often Romanized as “Tao Te Ching”).

These are the words of the philosopher Laozi (Lao Tzu).

The following is one translation of this passage:
To know others is wisdom;
To know oneself is acuity/intelligence.
To conquer others is power,
To conquer oneself is strength.
To know contentment is to have wealth.
To act resolutely is to have purpose.
To stay one's ground is to be enduring.
To die and yet not be forgotten is to be long-lived.
Another translation:
To understand others is to be knowledgeable;
To understand yourself is to be wise.
To conquer others is to have strength;
To conquer yourself is to be strong.
To know when you have enough is to be rich.
To go forward with strength is to have ambition.
To not lose your place is to be long-lasting.
To die but not be forgotten -- that's true long life.
A third translation of the second half:
He who is content is rich;
He who acts with persistence has will;
He who does not lose his roots will endure;
He who dies physically but preserves the Dao
will enjoy a long after-life.


Notes:

During our research, the Chinese characters shown here are probably the most accurate to the original text of Laozi. These were taken for the most part from the Mawangdui 1973 and Guodan 1993 manuscripts which pre-date other Daodejing texts by about 1000 years.

Grammar was a little different in Laozi’s time. So you should consider this to be the ancient Chinese version. Some have modernized this passage by adding, removing, or swapping articles and changing the grammar (we felt the oldest and most original version would be more desirable). You may find other versions printed in books or online - sometimes these modern texts are simply used to explain to Chinese people what the original text really means.

This language issue can be compared in English by thinking how the King James (known as the Authorized version in Great Britain) Bible from 1611 was written, and comparing it to modern English. Now imagine that the Daodejing was probably written around 403 BCE (2000 years before the King James Version of the Bible). To a Chinese person, the original Daodejing reads like text that is 3 times more detached compared to Shakespeare’s English is to our modern-day speech.

Extended notes:

While on this Biblical text comparison, it should be noted, that just like the Bible, all the original texts of the Daodejing were lost or destroyed long ago. Just as with the scripture used to create the Bible, various manuscripts exist, many with variations or copyist errors. Just as the earliest New Testament scripture (incomplete) is from 170 years after Christ, the earliest Daodejing manuscript (incomplete) is from 100-200 years after the death of Laozi.

The reason that the originals were lost probably has a lot to do with the first Qin Emperor. Upon taking power and unifying China, he ordered the burning and destruction of all books (scrolls/rolls) except those pertaining to Chinese medicine and a few other subjects. The surviving Daodejing manuscripts were either hidden on purpose or simply forgotten about. Some were not unearthed until as late as 1993.

We compared a lot of research by various archeologists and historians before deciding on this as the most accurate and correct version. But one must allow that it may not be perfect, or the actual and original as from the hand of Laozi himself.

Fortitude / Strength of Character

 gāng yì
 gouki
Fortitude / Strength of Character Scroll

剛毅 is a Japanese and Chinese word that means resolute and firm, fortitude, firmness of character, hardihood, manliness, or macho.


See Also:  Perseverance | Strength | Tenacity

Perseverance / Fortitude

 jiǎn rěn
 ken nin
Perseverance / Fortitude Scroll

堅忍 means persistent, steadfast, fortitude, and/or perseverance.

The first character means strong, solid, firm, unyielding, or resolute.
The second character means to beat, endure, or tolerate.
Together they speak of the strength from within yourself. Some may also translate this as long-suffering in a more Biblical sense.

堅忍 is a common term in Chinese and Korean Hanja but a little less commonly used in modern Japanese Kanji. For that reason, this selection is best if your audience is Chinese or Korean.


忍忍 Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the second Kanji a little differently. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect the form where the little horizontal stroke crosses the vertical stroke. See differences in the images to the right. Technically, they are both the same character, and will be read the same in either language.

Girl Power / Woman Power

 nǚ lì
 onna ryoku
Girl Power / Woman Power Scroll

This can be read as “girl power,” “woman power,” “women empowerment” or “female strength.”

女力 is kind of a strange or unofficial title in Chinese and Japanese. At least, it's not common for a wall scroll.

This should be “onna ryoku” in Japanese but I found some who suggest it should be “me riki.”

God Give Me Strength

 yuàn shàng dì gěi wǒ lì liàng
God Give Me Strength Scroll

願上帝給我力量 is a wish or a prayer that you might call out at a desperate time.

Translated by us for a military serviceman in Iraq. He may need to use this phrase often, though I am not sure where he's going to find a place to hang a wall scroll.

God Give Me Strength

 kami ga watashi ni chikara o atae te kudasai
God Give Me Strength Scroll

神が私に力を与えてください is “God give me strength” in Japanese.

This is the long and formal version. We also have a short version.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

God Give Me Strength

 kami wa watashi ni chikara o ataeru
God Give Me Strength Scroll

神は私に力を與える means “God give me strength,” in Japanese.

神は私に力を與える is the short version, we also have a longer more formal version.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Gutsy / Daring / Bold

 pò lì
 hakuryoku
Gutsy / Daring / Bold Scroll

迫力 is a Chinese word that is a form of personal strength.

It is a word that describes a person who is willing to take a risk. In English, we might say, “Someone with guts.”

An example might be a person that is not rich but invests a lot of money into something (knowing they could double their money or lose it all). Win or lose, this is a person that knows or pushes their potential.

Tearing this word apart, the first character means “to compel,” urgent, urge, force, imminent, or “spur on.” The second means power, strong, bear, or exert.

Note: 迫力 is also a word in Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja but with a meaning more like force, intensity, appeal, strength, impact, force, or simply power.

Hapkido

Korean Martial Art of re-directing force

 hé qì dào
 ai ki do
Hapkido Scroll

Hapkido or 合氣道 is a mostly-defensive martial art in Korea.

Hapkido has some connection to the Aikido of Japan. They are written with the same characters in both languages. However, it should be noted that the Korean Hanja characters shown here are the traditional Chinese form - but in modern Japan, the middle character was slightly simplified.
Note: You can consider this to be the older Japanese written form of Aikido. Titles on older books and signs about Aikido use this form.

The connection between Japanese Aikido and Korean Hapkido is muddled in history. The issue is probably due to the difficult relationship between the two countries around WWII. Many Koreans became virtual slaves to the Japanese during that period. After WWII, many things in Korea were disassociated from having any Japanese origin. The relationship has greatly mellowed out now.

Looking at the characters, the first means “union” or “harmony.”
The second character means “universal energy” or “spirit.”
The third means “way” or “method.”
One way to translate this into English is the “Harmonizing Energy Method.” This makes sense, as Hapkido has more to do with redirecting energy than fighting strength against strength.

More Hapkido info

More notes:
1. Sometimes Hapkido is Romanized as “hap ki do,” “hapki-do” “hab gi do” or “hapgido.”

2. Korean Hanja characters are actually Chinese characters that usually hold the same meaning in both languages. There was a time when these characters were the standard and only written form of Korean. The development of modern Korean Hangul characters is a somewhat recent event in the greater scope of history. There was a time when Chinese characters were the written form of many languages in places known in modern times as North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Mainland China, and a significant portion of Malaysia. Even today, more people in the world can read Chinese characters than English.

3. While these Korean Hanja characters can be pronounced in Chinese, this word is not well-known in China and is not considered part of the Chinese lexicon.

Healthy Living

 jiàn kāng shēng huó
 kenkou seikatsu
Healthy Living Scroll

If you are into healthy living, 健康生活 might be an excellent selection for a wall scroll to hang in your home.

The first two characters speak of health, vitality, vigor, and being of sound body. The second two characters mean living or life (daily existence).


See Also:  Strength | Vitality | Health

 xiǎng xiàng lì
 souzouryoku
Imagination Scroll

想像力 is probably the best way to express “imagination” in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

It literally means “your strength to imagine.” The last character means strength or ability, while the first two mean imagine or conceptualize. My Japanese dictionary defines this as “The power of imagination.” While my Korean dictionary says, “imaginative power.”

Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude

 bù qū
 fukutsu
Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude Scroll

不屈 is the short form of a longer Chinese word and also a word used in Korean and Japanese to express the idea of being indomitable. It literally means “will not bend,” “will not crouch,” “will not yield,” “will not flinch,” or “will not submit.”

Note: Some will translate this as “indomitable spirit”; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of “spirit” in this word.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Indomitable / Unyielding

 bù qū bù náo
 fu kutsu fu tou
Indomitable / Unyielding Scroll

不屈不撓 means “Indomitable” or “Unyielding.”

不屈不撓 is a long word by Chinese standards. At least, it is often translated as a single word into English. It's actually a proverb in Chinese.

If you want to break it down, you can see that the first and third characters are the same. Both mean “not” (they work as a suffix to make a negative or opposite meaning to whatever character follows).

The second character means “bendable.”

The last means “scratched” or “bothered.”

So this really means “Won't be bent, can't be bothered.” I have also seen it written as “Will not crouch, will not submit.” This comes from the fact that the second character can mean “to crouch” and the last can mean “to submit” (as in “to give in” such as “submitting to the rule of someone else”). This may explain better why these four characters mean “indomitable.”

Notes:
Some will translate this as “indomitable spirit”; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of “spirit” in this word.
Other translations include indefatigability, indomitableness, or unremitting tenacity.

The first two characters can be stand-alone words in Chinese.
In Japanese, this is considered two words (with very similar meanings). It's more common to see the word order flipped to 不撓不屈 in Japanese.
The same characters are used in old Korean Hanja. Just like in Japanese, the words are swapped to 不撓不屈 creating a word pronounced “불요불굴” in Korean.


See 不撓不屈


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Inner Strength / Inner Well-Being and Health

 nèi jiàn
Inner Strength / Inner Well-Being and Health Scroll

內健 is an old Chinese word meaning inner strength or inner health.

It's the idea of health and well-being starting or residing inside yourself. Also defined as fortitude within the context of good health.

Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance

 biǎo zhuàng bù rú lǐ zhuàng
Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance Scroll

表壯不如里壯 literally translates as: [Better to be] strong inside than [to be] strong outside.

The ancient original meaning was:
[An] able [husband] outside [working to support a family is] not as good as [an] able [wife] inside [working and saving to take care of the family].

The current meaning is:
Inner strength is more important than outward appearance.

Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance

 naimen no tsuyosa ha gaiken no yosa ni masaru
Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance Scroll

内面の強さは外見の良さに勝る is a Japanese proverb that literally translates as “inner/internal strength/power [versus] outward-appearance [the] merit/virtue/good quality [does] excel/surpass/exceed/outweigh.”

More naturally in English, this would be “Inner Strength Outweighs Outward Appearance.”


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Inner Strength

 nèi zài lì liàng
Inner Strength Scroll

內在力量 is the slightly-verbose way to say inner strength.

The first two characters mean “intrinsic” or “inner.” The second two characters mean “power,” “force” or “strength” (especially physical strength). 內在力量 is more a short phrase rather than just a word in Chinese and Korean. This can sort of be understood in Japanese but it's not normal/proper Japanese.

Inner Strength

 nèi lì
 nai ryoku
Inner Strength Scroll

內力 is the shorter version of inner strength (can also be translated as “internal force”). The first character holds the meaning of “inner” or “internal.” The second character means “power,” “force,” or “strength.”

內力 is a Kung Fu way of talking about an inner power or strength from within. This is a way to express “inner chi.” This is something that you might hear in a real Chinese Kung Fu movie.

While understood in Chinese and Japanese, this can have a secondary meaning of “inner stress” in Japanese.

Inner Strength / Self-Improvement

 zì qiáng
Inner Strength / Self-Improvement Scroll

自強 is the kind of inner strength that applies to a person who has will-power and can inspire themselves to do great things.

自強 can also be the creed of a person that always pursues self-improvement.

Other translations: self-strengthening, striving for improvement, self-improvement, striving to become stronger, and self-renewal.

 qiáng liè
 kyouretsu
Intensity Scroll

強烈 means intensity in regard to strength.

Note: In some contexts, this can mean violently strong or severe.

Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself

 zhí bǐ zhí jī
Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself Scroll

This proverb is from Sun Tzu's (Sunzi's) Art of War.

It means that if you know and understand the enemy, you also know yourself. Four secondary characters come after this in the Art of War (not included here) which suggests you cannot lose a battle when you follow this philosophy.

In a very literal and somewhat-boring way, this can also be translated as “Estimate correctly one's strength as well as that of one's opponent.”

 lì
Lee Scroll

This is the most common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the masculine western name Lee.

力 means “power” or “strength.”


Note: This can sometimes be used as a male given name in China. It is not the only given name that sounds like Lee or Li in China.

Love Faith Strength

 ài xìn qiáng
Love Faith Strength Scroll

愛信強 is the shortest way to write the word list, “love faith strength.”

The first character is love, the second is faith or believe, and the third means strong or strength.


It should be noted that word lists like this are not as natural sounding in Chinese as word lists can be in English. it’s more common to have a full phrase (with subject, verb, and object) or single words on calligraphy wall scrolls in Asia.

Love Faith Strength

 bó ài xìn niàn lì liàng
Love Faith Strength Scroll

博愛信念力量 is the verbose way to write the word list, “love faith strength.”


It should be noted that word lists like this are not as natural sounding in Chinese as word lists can be in English. it’s more common to have a full phrase (with subject, verb, and object) or single words on calligraphy wall scrolls in Asia.

Mighty / Powerful / Strong

 qiáng dà
 kyoudai
Mighty / Powerful / Strong Scroll

強大 can mean mighty, powerful, large, formidable, or strong.

This term is often used to describe soldiers/troops/warriors and whole armies.

Mind Over Matter

 busshitsu-sei o chouetsu suru seishin-ryoku
Mind Over Matter Scroll

物質性を超越する精神力 means “mind over matter,” in Japanese.

If you get really technical, you get a translation like, “mental strength transcends materiality.”


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

No Pain No Gain

Literally: No Pain, No Strength

 bú tòng bù qiáng
No Pain No Gain Scroll

不痛不強 is a proverb that is close to our idea of “no pain, no gain” in English. It holds this meaning in the context of working out at the gym etc.

不痛不強 means “no pain, no strength,” meaning that if you don't experience a little pain, you will not gain any strength.

Perseverance

 yì
 see note
 
Perseverance Scroll

毅 is the simplest way to express perseverance in Chinese and Korean Hanja.
This single-character version leaves a bit of mystery about what kind of perseverance you might want to convey.

In Korean, this is usually associated with “strength of character.”

In Japanese, this character can be pronounced in a dozen different ways (so we have left out the Japanese pronunciation guide that normally appears above). In Japanese, this Kanji would usually be translated as “strong” (perhaps strong-willed).


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Perseverance / Will-Power

 yì lì
Perseverance / Will-Power Scroll

毅力 is a way to express “perseverance” with the idea of “willpower” in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. It can also mean “strong-willed.”

The first character means “strong” and “persistent,” while the second means “strength” and “power.”

Perseverance / Indomitable / Invincible Fortitude

 jiān rěn bù bá
 kenninfubatsu
Perseverance / Indomitable / Invincible Fortitude Scroll

堅忍不抜 means determined, steadfast, unswerving, or unshakable in Japanese.

This is the Japanese version of an old Chinese 4-character perseverance proverb.
This would be understood in Chinese, but it's not commonly written this way in Chinese.


忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese calligraphers sometimes write the second Kanji in the form shown to the right. Yes, it’s just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in this alternate Japanese Kanji form. If you have a preference, let us know when you order.

Due to some odd computer coding conventions, these two character forms were combined/merged into the same code point - thus, you will not see Kanji images of more Japanese form as you select options for your scroll.

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges

 bǎi zhé bù náo
 hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Scroll

百折不撓 is a Chinese proverb that means “Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks.”

More directly translated, it reads, “[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching.” 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan, and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose the corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and the common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career, a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest, he resigned from his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads “Bai Zhe Bu Nao” which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strong will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as “keep on fighting despite all setbacks,” “be undaunted by repeated setbacks,” and “be indomitable.”

Our translator says it can mean “never give up” in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as “repeated setbacks,” the literal meaning is “100 setbacks” or “a rope that breaks 100 times.” The last two characters can mean “do not yield” or “do not give up.”
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Potential / Momentum

 shì
 zei
 
Potential / Momentum Scroll

勢 is a word that means potential or momentum in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

Depending on the context, this can also be translated as an influence, tendency, military strength (potential), or power.

Resilience / Restoration / Recovery

 huī fù lì
Resilience / Restoration / Recovery Scroll

恢復力 suggests having the power to recover, restore, and rehabilitate. This can refer to yourself, someone else, or even to something, like rehabilitating a burned forest. 恢復力 is the essence of resilience in life.

The first two characters are a word that means to reinstate, resume, restore, recover, regain, or rehabilitate, restoration, rehabilitation, recovery, return, improvement, recovery (from an illness), recuperation, or convalescence.

The last character means strength or power.


See Also:  Tenacity | Perseverance

Strength and Love in Unity

 riki ai fu ni
Strength and Love in Unity Scroll

力愛不二 is a proverb that literally means:
“Strength [and] Love [are] Not Two [separate ideas/concepts/things].”

You'll find this proverb translated from Japanese to English as:
Love and strength are not separate.
Power and love are indivisible.
Strength and love in harmony.
Strength and love stand together.

Old Japanese grammar is quite different than English, and so this proverb says a lot within the brevity of just 4 characters. If you just read these characters directly as “Strength Love Not Two,” you'd probably miss the real meaning.


According to the Swedish Shorinji Kempo Federation, this is the second characteristic of Shorinji Kempo.

This post really explains the concept best in my opinion: Bushido by MS: Riki Ai Fu Ni, which states: "Riki Ai Funi" is the philosophy that power (Riki) and love (Ai) are indivisible. More concretely, a person, who is powerful but does not have love, cannot control and misuse his/her power; on the other hand, a person, who has loved ones but is not powerful enough, cannot protect himself/herself nor loved ones.

Sincere / True Sincerity

 zhēn chéng
Sincere / True Sincerity Scroll

真誠 is the true essence of sincerity.

It takes strength of personality to be truly sincere without overdoing it. Speaking of strength, this is probably the strongest way to convey the idea of sincerity in the Chinese language.

The first character literally means true, real, and genuine. While the second character means sincere and honest.


See Also:  Love | Honor

Flexibility Overcomes Strength

Softness Overcomes Hardness

 yǐ róu kè gāng
Flexibility Overcomes Strength Scroll

以柔克剛 can be translated as “Softness Overcomes Hardness,” “Flexibility Overcomes Power,” “Flexibility Overcomes Strength,” “Overcoming Powerful Strength with Flexibility,” or “Use Softness to Conquer Strength.”

Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit

 jīng shén lì liàng
 seishin rikiryou
Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit Scroll

精神力量 is a title that speaks of one's soul or spirit and the capacity or strength that soul possesses.

The first two characters mean mind, heart, spirit, and/or soul.

The last two characters mean strength, capacity, or ability.

Note: Separately, these are two words in Japanese and can be pronounced, but this does not make a natural title in Japanese (best if your audience is Chinese).

Strength / Ability

 lì liàng
 riki ryou
Strength / Ability Scroll

力量 is a general strength term.

It can refer to mental or physical strength (depending on context). 力量 can also be used to describe strength in terms of capability, capacity, ability, and even tact. Some may translate this as power or force.

Strength and Honor

 lì liàng yǔ róng yù
Strength and Honor Scroll

力量與榮譽 is “strength and honor” in Chinese.

The first two characters are usually understood as (physical) strength but can also mean power or force.

The middle character is a connecting particle similar to “and.”

The last two characters are a way to say honor but can also be understood as honorable reputation, honorary, or glory.

Strength and Honor

 chikara to mei yo
Strength and Honor Scroll

力と名譽 is “strength and honor” in Japanese Kanji (with one Hiragana).

The first Kanji is understood as strength, power, or force.

The second character is a connecting particle-like, “and” or “with.”

The last two Kanji mean honor/honour, credit, or prestige. This last word is also used in the Bushido code to mean honor.

Strength and Love

 lì yǔ ài
Strength and Love Scroll

While not a common title for a wall scroll in China, 力與愛 means “strength and love” or “power and love” in Chinese characters.

Strength and Courage

 lì liàng hé yǒng qì
Strength and Courage Scroll

While 力量和勇氣 is not a typical Chinese phrase, this is how to write “strength and courage.”

If this is an important idea for you, we can make a great custom Chinese “strength and courage” wall scroll for you.

Strength and Courage

 riki to yu ki
Strength and Courage Scroll

力と勇気 may not be the most common Japanese phrase, but this is how to write “strength and courage” or “power and bravery” in Japanese.

Herculean Strength

 qiáng lì
 kyou ryoku
Herculean Strength Scroll

強力 means herculean strength, powerful, or strong.

I've even heard this described as “strength to carry a mountain.”


Note: This can also be the Japanese surname Gouriki (like Mr. Strong).

Strength / Vigor / Energy

Physical Strength

 qì lì
 kiryoku
Strength / Vigor / Energy Scroll

氣力 can mean any of the words in the title above, and in some contexts, can also mean effort, will-power, or talent.

This refers mostly to physical strength (as opposed to mental or spiritual).


気In modern Japan, they use a simplified first character for this word. If you want to order this title with that special Japanese version, click on the character to the right instead of the button above.

Physical Strength

 tǐ lì
 tai ryoku
Physical Strength Scroll

體力 means “physical strength,” “physical power,” or “physical stamina” in Chinese, ancient Japanese, and old Korean Hanja.


See Also:  Fortitude | Health

Physical Strength

 tǐ lì
 tairyoku
Physical Strength Scroll

体力 means “physical strength” or “physical power.”

The first character was first simplified in Japan. Later, that simplified version became the standard in mainland China. Just in case you want this version, it is offered here. I suggest it if your audience is Japanese. Most Chinese know the older traditional version, which looks like 體力.

体力 can also be defined: stamina; endurance; physical strength; resilience; resistance to disease; clout; stability.

Power / Strength

 lì
 chikara / ryoku
 
Power / Strength Scroll

力 is the simplest form of “power” or “strength.”

In Japanese, it is pronounced “chikara” when used alone, and “ryoku” when used in a sentence (there are also a few other possible pronunciations of this Kanji in Japanese).

In some contexts, this can mean ability, force, physical strength, capability, and influence.


See Also:  Strength | Vitality | Health

Strength: Strong and Solid

 qiáng gù
 kyouko
Strength: Strong and Solid Scroll

強固 means firmness, stability, security, and strength in Japanese.

It's not used commonly in China, but it means “powerful,” “firm,” “solid,” “strong,” or “better than others” in Chinese. There is a slight variation in the top of the first character between Chinese and Japanese. Because this is more of a Japanese word, we are showing the Japanese form here.

強固 is also a Korean word, but Korean Hanja uses the Chinese form of the first character (one tiny stroke is a little different), so just let me know if your audience is Korean when you place your order, and we'll have it written in the Chinese/Korean version.

Always Striving for Inner Strength

 zì qiáng bú xī
Always Striving for Inner Strength Scroll

自強不息 is a proverb or idiom that suggests that the pursuit of self-improvement is eternal. It can also be a suggestion to strive unremittingly in life.

The first two characters mean inner strength with the idea of self-improvement. The last two characters mean “never rest” or “striving without giving up.”

Some will translate these four characters as “Exert and strive hard without any let-up.”

Strong / Powerful

 qiáng zhuàng
 kyousou
Strong / Powerful Scroll

強壯 is an adjective that means powerful or strong.

It can also be translated as able-bodied, robust, or sturdy.
This version of strength also suggests muscularity.


壮Note that the second character was simplified in Japan after WWII (also simplified in mainland China but not for calligraphy). If you want the modern Japanese/simplified version, please click on the Kanji shown to the right.


See Also:  Strength | Vitality | Health

Strong / Powerful / Force

 qiáng
 kyou
 
Strong / Powerful / Force Scroll

強 is a character that means strong, strength, force, powerful, better, stubborn, and stiff (yes, all of this in one character).

This “strong” has less to do with physical strength and more to do with having a winning attitude, or just having the ability to win at something.

Note that most of the time, this character is pronounced “qiang” but when used with the meaning of stubborn, unyielding, or stiff, it is pronounced “jiang” in Chinese.

Also, sometimes “qiang” is used in modern Chinese to describe people that do crazy things (For example: Bicycling from Beijing to Tibet alone). I sometimes can be found outside my Beijing apartment wearing nothing but shorts and a tee-shirt while eating ice cream during a snow storm, just to hear my neighbors call me “qiang.” Maybe they mean “strong” but perhaps they are using the new meaning of “crazy strong.”

強 can also be a Chinese surname that romanizes as Jiang in the mainland or Chiang if from Taiwan.

強 is a valid Korean Hanja character with the same meaning but is mostly used in compound Korean words.

強 is used in Japanese (though normally in compound words). In Japanese, it has the same meaning but in some contexts can mean “a little more than...” or “a little over [some amount].” Most Japanese would read this as tough, strength, stiff, hard, inflexible, obstinate, or stubborn.

The variant 彊 is sometimes seen in older literature.

Strong / Robust

 zhuàng
 sou
 
Strong / Robust Scroll

This “strong” character means “to strengthen” or robust. This brings images of a muscle-bound hulk of a weight lifter or bodybuilder to an Asian person who sees this character.

Note that in Korean and Japanese, this character is normally part of compound words, and is not seen alone too often.


壮Note that the this character was simplified in Japan after WWII (also simplified in mainland China but not for calligraphy). If you want the modern Japanese/simplified version, please click on the Kanji shown to the right.

Strong / Healthy

 jiàn
 ken
 
Strong / Healthy Scroll

This “strong” character is the more “healthy” version of strong. 健 is the “strong” that is appropriate for an athlete.

Beyond “healthy,” it can also mean strength, persistence, vigorous, or invigorated/invigoration.

Strong and Beautiful

 jiàn měi
 takemi
Strong and Beautiful Scroll

We don't really have a word like 健美 in English, but these two characters create a word that means “strong and beautiful.” It could also be translated as “healthy and beautiful.”

Note: 健美 is a word in Chinese and Korean, but it's also the family name Takemi in Japanese. The characters hold the same meaning in Japanese; however, it's like having the English name Stillwell when few people would perceive the meanings of still and well.

Strong / Healthy

 sukoyaka
Strong / Healthy Scroll

健やか is a verbose way to say strong and healthy in Japanese. 健やか is the “strong” that is appropriate for an athlete.

Beyond “healthy,” it can also mean strength, persistence, vigorous, or invigoration.

Japanese also use the first Kanji to mean the same thing. This version adds two hiragana which serve to emphasize or amplify the word and clarify the meaning.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

 yì zhì jiān qiáng
Strong Hearted / Strong Willed Scroll

意志堅強 can mean either “strong-hearted,” “strong-willed” or “determination.”

The first two characters can be translated as “will,” “willpower,” “determination,” “volition,” “intention,” or “intent.” But, it should be noted that this first part possesses the element of “heart” in the lower portion of both characters (they also partially carry the meaning “with the whole heart”).

The last two characters mean “strong” or “staunch.”

Chinese word order and grammar are a bit different than English, so in this case, they are in reverse order of English but have the correct meaning in a natural form.


See Also:  Strong Willed | Discipline | Will-Power

With all the strength of your heart

 omoi kiri
With all the strength of your heart Scroll

思い切り can be translated as “with all one's strength,” “with all one's heart,” “to the limits of your heart,” or “to the end of your heart/emotions.”

The character breakdown:
思い (omoi) thought; mind; heart; feelings; emotion; sentiment; love; affection; desire; wish; hope; expectation; imagination; experience
切り (kiri) bounds; limits.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strong Woman

 nǚ qiáng rén
Strong Woman Scroll

女強人 is the best way to say “strong woman” or “strong and independent woman” in Chinese.

Grammar in China is a bit different, so these three characters literally read as “female strength person” or “woman strong person.” This might sound funny in English, but this is a natural-sounding title in Chinese.

Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan

 tài jí quán
 tai kyoku ken
Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan Scroll

太極拳 is the famous Taoist meditation and martial art exercise. The direct translation of these characters would be something like “grand ultimate fist,” but that does not quite hit the mark for what this title really means.

An early-morning walk through any city in China near a park or an open area will yield a view of Chinese people practicing this ancient technique.

A typical scene is an old man of no less than 80 years on this earth, with a wispy white beard and perhaps a sword in one hand. He makes slow moves that are impossibly smooth. He is steady-footed and always in balance. For him, time is meaningless and proper form, and technique is far more important than speed.

For the younger generation, faster moves may look impressive and seem smooth to the casual observer. But more discipline and mental strength are needed to create perfectly smooth moves in virtual slow motion.

Note: There are two ways to Romanize these Chinese characters, as seen in the title above. The pronunciation and actual characters are the same in Chinese. If you really used English sounds/words to pronounce this, it would be something like “tie jee chew-on” (make the “chew-on” one flowing syllable).

Tempering Makes Strong Steel

Hardship Develops Strong Character

 bǎi liàn cái chéng gāng
Tempering Makes Strong Steel Scroll

百煉才成鋼 / 百煉纔成鋼 literally translates as: Only after much tempering is steel produced.

Figuratively, this means: True character must be tested in hardship.

This is a mild form of saying, “Whatever doesn't kill me, makes me stronger.”

Tenacious / Tenacity

 wán qiáng
 gan kyou
Tenacious / Tenacity Scroll

頑強 means “Tenacious,” “Hard to Defeat,” or “Dogged.”

Alone, the first character means mischievous, obstinate, or stubborn. But it loses some of the mischievous meaning when the second character is added.

The second character means strength, force, power, or better.


See Also:  Determination | Dedication | Devotion | Never Give Up

Carry On, Undaunted

 qián fù hòu jì
Carry On, Undaunted Scroll

前赴後繼 is a Chinese proverb that figuratively means “to advance dauntlessly in wave upon wave.”

It suggests that you should or can carry on and have the strength to keep going.

While this proverb is a little bit militaristic, it suggests that despite a fallen comrade (or perhaps a loved one), you should keep going and work towards the goal they intended.

 shēng mìng lì
 seimeiryoku
Vitality Scroll

生命力 can mean “vitality” or “libido.”

The first two characters mean “life” or “life force.” The last character is a common word that means “strength.” So together, you get the meaning of “life strength” which is the essence of vitality.

Some will also translate this word as “good health.”


See Also:  Life Force | Health

Stay Strong / Iron Will

 tesshin sekichou
Stay Strong / Iron Will Scroll

鉄心石腸 is a Japanese proverb that suggests you should have the inner-strength and will as hard and steadfast as iron.

It's the Japanese way of saying, “stay strong.” This is an especially uplifting thing to say to a person in distress or recovering from a disaster. It's kind of the survivor's creed.

If you literally translate this, it means “iron will, stone guts” or “iron heart, rock-hard bowels.”

Determination to Achieve / Will-Power

 yì zhì
 ishi
Determination to Achieve / Will-Power Scroll

意志 is a Chinese, Korean, and Japanese word that means “determination to achieve.” It can also be translated as: will; willpower; determination; volition; intention; or intent.

In Japanese, this can also be the given name, Ishi.

Will-Power / Self-Control

 yì zhì lì
 ishi ryoku
Will-Power / Self-Control Scroll

意志力 is a form of willpower or self-control and is about having the determination or tenacity to keep going.

In Japanese, this is the power of will, the strength of will, volition, intention, intent, or determination.

Dragon

Year of the Dragon / Zodiac Sign

 lóng
 ryuu / tatsu
Dragon Scroll

龍 is the character for dragon in Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

The dragon is a creature of myth and legend that dominates Chinese, Japanese, and even European folklore. In China, the dragon is the symbol of the Emperor, strength, and power, and the Chinese dragon is known as the god of water.

From the Chinese Zodiac, if you were born in the year of the Dragon, you . . .

Have a strong body and spirit.
Are full of energy.
Have vast goals.
Have a deep level of self-awareness.
Will do whatever you can to “save face.”


See also our Chinese Zodiac or Dragon Calligraphy pages.

Shitsujitsu Goken

 shitsu jitsu gou ken
Shitsujitsu Goken Scroll

質実剛健 is a Japanese word that can mean “unaffected and sincere, with fortitude and vigor” or “simplicity and fortitude.”

The first two characters, 質実 mean simplicity or the “essence of something.”
The last two, 剛健, mean strength, fortitude, or strong composure.

 dà lì
 dai riki
Great Power Scroll

大力 can mean immense physical strength or great power.

This can also act as an adjective for expressing how energetically or vigorously something is.

This can also be a given name, Dairiki, in Japanese.

Conquering Yourself is a Sign of Strength

 zì shèng zhě qiáng yě
Conquering Yourself is a Sign of Strength Scroll

自勝者強也 means “One who conquers oneself is strong” in Chinese.

自勝 = Self-overcoming or self-conquering
者 = is
強 = Strength
也 = Also

Strength Love Honor

 lì liàng bó ài róng yù
Strength Love Honor Scroll

力量 博愛 榮譽 is the verbose way to write the word list, “strength love honor.”


It should be noted that word lists like this are not as natural sounding in Chinese as word lists can be in English. it’s more common to have a full phrase (with subject, verb, and object) or single words on calligraphy wall scrolls in Asia.

I've noticed you are searching for "god strength". If you are interested, I can have your favorite verse from the Torah or Bible translated into Chinese and written on a wall scroll for you. Please contact me siting the verse or verses you want. Here is an example: Joshua 24:15.

If you are looking for a Jewish or Christian title, phrase, or word, I have a great selection here: Christian Words in Chinese




This in-stock artwork might be what you are looking for, and ships right away...


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Body and Earth in Unity身土不二shindofuni / shindofuji
Cooperation協力
协力
kyouryoku / kyoryokuxié lì / xie2 li4 / xie li / xielihsieh li / hsiehli
Courage and Strength勇力yuu ri / yuuri / yu riyǒng lì / yong3 li4 / yong li / yongliyung li / yungli
Creativity創造力
创造力
souzouryoku
sozoryoku
chuàng zào lì
chuang4 zao4 li4
chuang zao li
chuangzaoli
ch`uang tsao li
chuangtsaoli
chuang tsao li
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33
知人者知也自知者明也勝人者有力也自勝者強也知足者富也強行者有志也不失其所者久也死而不亡者壽也
知人者知也自知者明也胜人者有力也自胜者强也知足者富也强行者有志也不失其所者久也死而不亡者寿也
zhī rén zhě zhī yě zì zhī zhě míng yě shèng rén zhě yǒu lì yě zì shèng zhě qiáng yě zhī zú zhě fù yě qiáng xíng zhě yǒu zhì yě bù zhī qí suǒ zhě jiǔ yě sǐ ér bù wáng zhě shòu yě
zhi1 ren2 zhe3 zhi1 ye3 zi4 zhi1 zhe3 ming2 ye3 sheng4 ren2 zhe3 you3 li4 ye3 zi4 sheng4 zhe3 qiang2 ye3 zhi1 zu2 zhe3 fu4 ye3 qiang2 xing2 zhe3 you3 zhi4 ye3 bu4 zhi1 qi2 suo3 zhe3 jiu3 ye3 si3 er2 bu4 wang2 zhe3 shou4 ye3
zhi ren zhe zhi ye zi zhi zhe ming ye sheng ren zhe you li ye zi sheng zhe qiang ye zhi zu zhe fu ye qiang xing zhe you zhi ye bu zhi qi suo zhe jiu ye si er bu wang zhe shou ye
chih jen che chih yeh tzu chih che ming yeh sheng jen che yu li yeh tzu sheng che ch`iang yeh chih tsu che fu yeh ch`iang hsing che yu chih yeh pu chih ch`i so che chiu yeh ssu erh pu wang che shou yeh
chih jen che chih yeh tzu chih che ming yeh sheng jen che yu li yeh tzu sheng che chiang yeh chih tsu che fu yeh chiang hsing che yu chih yeh pu chih chi so che chiu yeh ssu erh pu wang che shou yeh
Fortitude
Strength of Character
剛毅
刚毅
gouki / gokigāng yì / gang1 yi4 / gang yi / gangyikang i / kangi
Perseverance
Fortitude
堅忍
坚忍
ken nin / kenninjiǎn rěn / jian3 ren3 / jian ren / jianrenchien jen / chienjen
Girl Power
Woman Power
女力onna ryoku / onnaryokunǚ lì / nv3 li4 / nv li / nvlinü li / nüli
God Give Me Strength願上帝給我力量
愿上帝给我力量
yuàn shàng dì gěi wǒ lì liàng
yuan4 shang4 di4 gei3 wo3 li4 liang4
yuan shang di gei wo li liang
yuanshangdigeiwoliliang
yüan shang ti kei wo li liang
yüanshangtikeiwoliliang
God Give Me Strength神が私に力を與えてください
神が私に力を与えてください
kami ga watashi ni chikara o atae te kudasai
God Give Me Strength神は私に力を與える
神は私に力を与える
kami wa watashi ni chikara o ataeru
Gutsy
Daring
Bold
迫力hakuryokupò lì / po4 li4 / po li / polip`o li / poli / po li
Hapkido合氣道
合气道
ai ki do / aikidohé qì dào
he2 qi4 dao4
he qi dao
heqidao
ho ch`i tao
hochitao
ho chi tao
Healthy Living健康生活kenkou seikatsu
kenkouseikatsu
kenko seikatsu
jiàn kāng shēng huó
jian4 kang1 sheng1 huo2
jian kang sheng huo
jiankangshenghuo
chien k`ang sheng huo
chienkangshenghuo
chien kang sheng huo
Imagination想像力souzouryoku
sozoryoku
xiǎng xiàng lì
xiang3 xiang4 li4
xiang xiang li
xiangxiangli
hsiang hsiang li
hsianghsiangli
Indomitable
Persistence
Fortitude
不屈fukutsubù qū / bu4 qu1 / bu qu / buqupu ch`ü / puchü / pu chü
Indomitable
Unyielding
不屈不撓
不屈不挠
fu kutsu fu tou
fukutsufutou
fu kutsu fu to
bù qū bù náo
bu4 qu1 bu4 nao2
bu qu bu nao
buqubunao
pu ch`ü pu nao
puchüpunao
pu chü pu nao
Inner Strength
Inner Well-Being and Health
內健nèi jiàn / nei4 jian4 / nei jian / neijiannei chien / neichien
Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance表壯不如里壯
表壮不如里壮
biǎo zhuàng bù rú lǐ zhuàng
biao3 zhuang4 bu4 ru2 li3 zhuang4
biao zhuang bu ru li zhuang
biaozhuangburulizhuang
piao chuang pu ju li chuang
piaochuangpujulichuang
Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance内面の強さは外見の良さに勝るnaimen no tsuyosa ha gaiken no yosa ni masaru
Inner Strength內在力量
内在力量
nèi zài lì liàng
nei4 zai4 li4 liang4
nei zai li liang
neizaililiang
nei tsai li liang
neitsaililiang
Inner Strength內力
内力
nai ryoku / nairyokunèi lì / nei4 li4 / nei li / neili
Inner Strength
Self-Improvement
自強
自强
zì qiáng / zi4 qiang2 / zi qiang / ziqiangtzu ch`iang / tzuchiang / tzu chiang
Intensity強烈
强烈
kyouretsu / kyoretsuqiáng liè
qiang2 lie4
qiang lie
qianglie
ch`iang lieh
chianglieh
chiang lieh
Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself知彼知己zhí bǐ zhí jī
zhi2 bi3 zhi2 ji1
zhi bi zhi ji
zhibizhiji
chih pi chih chi
chihpichihchi
Leelì / li4 / li
Love Faith Strength愛信強
爱信強
ài xìn qiáng
ai4 xin4 qiang2
ai xin qiang
aixinqiang
ai hsin ch`iang
aihsinchiang
ai hsin chiang
Love Faith Strength博愛信念力量
博爱信念力量
bó ài xìn niàn lì liàng
bo2 ai4 xin4 nian4 li4 liang4
bo ai xin nian li liang
boaixinnianliliang
po ai hsin nien li liang
poaihsinnienliliang
Mighty
Powerful
Strong
強大
强大
kyoudai / kyodaiqiáng dà / qiang2 da4 / qiang da / qiangdach`iang ta / chiangta / chiang ta
Mind Over Matter物質性を超越する精神力busshitsu-sei o chouetsu suru seishin-ryoku
bushitsu-sei o choetsu suru seishin-ryoku
No Pain No Gain不痛不強
不痛不强
bú tòng bù qiáng
bu2 tong4 bu4 qiang2
bu tong bu qiang
butongbuqiang
pu t`ung pu ch`iang
putungpuchiang
pu tung pu chiang
Perseverancesee note / seenote / se noteyì / yi4 / yii
Perseverance
Will-Power
毅力yì lì / yi4 li4 / yi li / yilii li / ili
Perseverance
Indomitable
Invincible Fortitude
堅忍不抜 / 堅忍不拔
坚忍不拔
kenninfubatsujiān rěn bù bá
jian1 ren3 bu4 ba2
jian ren bu ba
jianrenbuba
chien jen pu pa
chienjenpupa
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks百折不撓
百折不挠
hyaku setsu su tou
hyakusetsusutou
hyaku setsu su to
bǎi zhé bù náo
bai3 zhe2 bu4 nao2
bai zhe bu nao
baizhebunao
pai che pu nao
paichepunao
Potential
Momentum

zeishì / shi4 / shishih
Resilience
Restoration
Recovery
恢復力
恢复力
huī fù lì
hui1 fu4 li4
hui fu li
huifuli
Strength and Love in Unity力愛不二
力爱不二
riki ai fu ni
rikiaifuni
Sincere
True Sincerity
真誠
真诚
zhēn chéng
zhen1 cheng2
zhen cheng
zhencheng
chen ch`eng
chencheng
chen cheng
Flexibility Overcomes Strength以柔克剛
以柔克刚
yǐ róu kè gāng
yi3 rou2 ke4 gang1
yi rou ke gang
yiroukegang
i jou k`o kang
ijoukokang
i jou ko kang
Spiritual Strength
Strength of Spirit
精神力量seishin rikiryou
seishinrikiryou
seishin rikiryo
jīng shén lì liàng
jing1 shen2 li4 liang4
jing shen li liang
jingshenliliang
ching shen li liang
chingshenliliang
Strength
Ability
力量riki ryou / rikiryou / riki ryolì liàng / li4 liang4 / li liang / liliang
Strength and Honor力量與榮譽
力量与荣誉
lì liàng yǔ róng yù
li4 liang4 yu3 rong2 yu4
li liang yu rong yu
liliangyurongyu
li liang yü jung yü
liliangyüjungyü
Strength and Honor力と名譽
力と名誉
chikara to mei yo
chikaratomeiyo
Strength and Love力與愛
力与爱
lì yǔ ài
li4 yu3 ai4
li yu ai
liyuai
li yü ai
liyüai
Strength and Courage力量和勇氣
力量和勇气
lì liàng hé yǒng qì
li4 liang4 he2 yong3 qi4
li liang he yong qi
liliangheyongqi
li liang ho yung ch`i
lilianghoyungchi
li liang ho yung chi
Strength and Courage力と勇氣
力と勇気
riki to yu ki
rikitoyuki
Herculean Strength強力
强力
kyou ryoku / kyouryoku / kyo ryokuqiáng lì / qiang2 li4 / qiang li / qianglich`iang li / chiangli / chiang li
Strength
Vigor
Energy
氣力
气力 / 気力
kiryokuqì lì / qi4 li4 / qi li / qilich`i li / chili / chi li
Physical Strength體力
体力
tai ryoku / tairyokutǐ lì / ti3 li4 / ti li / tilit`i li / tili / ti li
Physical Strength體力
体力
tairyokutǐ lì / ti3 li4 / ti li / tilit`i li / tili / ti li
Power
Strength
chikara / ryokulì / li4 / li
Strength: Strong and Solid強固
强固
kyouko / kyokoqiáng gù / qiang2 gu4 / qiang gu / qiangguch`iang ku / chiangku / chiang ku
Always Striving for Inner Strength自強不息
自强不息
zì qiáng bú xī
zi4 qiang2 bu2 xi1
zi qiang bu xi
ziqiangbuxi
tzu ch`iang pu hsi
tzuchiangpuhsi
tzu chiang pu hsi
Strong
Powerful
強壯
强壮
kyousou / kyosoqiáng zhuàng
qiang2 zhuang4
qiang zhuang
qiangzhuang
ch`iang chuang
chiangchuang
chiang chuang
Strong
Powerful
Force

kyou / kyoqiáng / qiang2 / qiangch`iang / chiang
Strong
Robust

sou / sozhuàng / zhuang4 / zhuangchuang
Strong
Healthy
kenjiàn / jian4 / jianchien
Strong and Beautiful健美takemijiàn měi / jian4 mei3 / jian mei / jianmeichien mei / chienmei
Strong
Healthy
健やかsukoyaka
Strong Hearted
Strong Willed
意志堅強
意志坚强
yì zhì jiān qiáng
yi4 zhi4 jian1 qiang2
yi zhi jian qiang
yizhijianqiang
i chih chien ch`iang
ichihchienchiang
i chih chien chiang
With all the strength of your heart思い切りomoi kiri / omoikiri
Strong Woman女強人
女强人
nǚ qiáng rén
nv3 qiang2 ren2
nv qiang ren
nvqiangren
nü ch`iang jen
nüchiangjen
nü chiang jen
Tai Chi Chuan
Tai Ji Quan
太極拳
太极拳
tai kyoku ken
taikyokuken
tài jí quán
tai4 ji2 quan2
tai ji quan
taijiquan
t`ai chi ch`üan
taichichüan
tai chi chüan
Tempering Makes Strong Steel百煉才成鋼 / 百煉纔成鋼
百炼才成钢
bǎi liàn cái chéng gāng
bai3 lian4 cai2 cheng2 gang1
bai lian cai cheng gang
bailiancaichenggang
pai lien ts`ai ch`eng kang
pailientsaichengkang
pai lien tsai cheng kang
Tenacious
Tenacity
頑強
顽强
gan kyou / gankyou / gan kyowán qiáng
wan2 qiang2
wan qiang
wanqiang
wan ch`iang
wanchiang
wan chiang
Carry On, Undaunted前赴後繼
前赴后继
qián fù hòu jì
qian2 fu4 hou4 ji4
qian fu hou ji
qianfuhouji
ch`ien fu hou chi
chienfuhouchi
chien fu hou chi
Vitality生命力seimeiryokushēng mìng lì
sheng1 ming4 li4
sheng ming li
shengmingli
Stay Strong
Iron Will
鉄心石腸tesshin sekichou
tesshinsekichou
teshin sekicho
Determination to Achieve
Will-Power
意志ishiyì zhì / yi4 zhi4 / yi zhi / yizhii chih / ichih
Will-Power
Self-Control
意志力ishi ryoku / ishiryokuyì zhì lì
yi4 zhi4 li4
yi zhi li
yizhili
i chih li
ichihli
Dragon
ryuu / tatsu
ryu / tatsu
lóng / long2 / longlung
Shitsujitsu Goken質実剛健shitsu jitsu gou ken
shitsujitsugouken
shitsu jitsu go ken
Great Power大力dai riki / dairikidà lì / da4 li4 / da li / dalita li / tali
Conquering Yourself is a Sign of Strength自勝者強也zì shèng zhě qiáng yě
zi4 sheng4 zhe3 qiang2 ye3
zi sheng zhe qiang ye
zishengzheqiangye
tzu sheng che ch`iang yeh
tzushengchechiangyeh
tzu sheng che chiang yeh
Strength Love Honor力量博愛榮譽
力量博爱荣誉
lì liàng bó ài róng yù
li4 liang4 bo2 ai4 rong2 yu4
li liang bo ai rong yu
liliangboairongyu
li liang po ai jung yü
liliangpoaijungyü
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Dictionary

Lookup God Strength in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as God Strength Kanji, God Strength Characters, God Strength in Mandarin Chinese, God Strength Characters, God Strength in Chinese Writing, God Strength in Japanese Writing, God Strength in Asian Writing, God Strength Ideograms, Chinese God Strength symbols, God Strength Hieroglyphics, God Strength Glyphs, God Strength in Chinese Letters, God Strength Hanzi, God Strength in Japanese Kanji, God Strength Pictograms, God Strength in the Chinese Written-Language, or God Strength in the Japanese Written-Language.

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God Strength was last searched for by someone else on Feb 13th, 2024